Neriman Polat/ THRESHOLD

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Viterbo •|• Virtual D

THRESHOLD

Solo exhibition of Neriman Polat

curated by Carla Paiolo and Giorgia Noto

-12 May 2015. h. 19.00 | from 2.05.2015 to 27.06.2015
catalogue/graphic project by Andrea Bennati
disambigua artspace | Via delle Fabbriche 47. 01100. Viterbo
mob: +39 3475476404 info@disambiguartspace.com
Open Tuesday-Saturday h. 16-21 or by appointment. Closed on Sundays and public holidays.

http://www.disambiguartspace.com

-3-2Neriman Polat / Threshold

> versione italiana

Threshold is the solo exhibition of Neriman Polat held at disambigua artspace, conceived as a mental download of a portion of a physical and geographical space from which it  starts (locally); it is a revelation of sign among signs, a constant allusion to the cognitive limits of a society intermittently linked to multitasking (globally).
Multitasking – which takes the form of a metaphorical germ – is the latent seed found in  the sense of trespassing the “threshold limit”, in a short-sighted world prone to fast data  back-up. Distortions on which the excess of information is based, mostly characterized by  censorship phenomena or by inappropriately limited spaces in the media (see women’s  resistance in Kobane), and a fundamental contradiction related to the same facts. For Derrida, the truthfulness of a fact is not based on its actual happening, but on the messenger’s ability to report that fact, the Media tell us the facts, but never all about the facts.
The mental download of the Turkish artist, revelation and threshold, aims to dismantle these concealments, constantly referring to the difficulty of recognizing honesty in the practice of providing information, especially at this moment in history, in which we are gradually witnessing a suspension of integrity and the collapse of the perception of reality, where conflicts represent a noiseless custom, where blood is no longer perceived and we only remain movable inside our own life segment.
The Neriman Polat solo exhibition has been structured thinking of the human geographical limits/ borders in a broad sense. In fact, though considering her own country of origin, Turkey, Neriman Polat has in mind an extensive map, and this is another reason why the specific vocabulary of computer science has been adopted. As well as the small dimensions of the exhibition space, all these concepts are juxtaposed through the choice of an intense narration that is filled with objects (clothes) and photographs, a recurring medium in women’s artistic poetry. An overall picture shaped on strong images referring almost totally to the female universe, outlining the size and the importance of the issues covered.
Neriman Polat chooses the threshold as the identifying symbol of the exhibition, while stepping on it as an act of strong tension until multiple opportunities of evasion and hope are created. The threshold, indeed, represents a sacred place in Anatolian culture, and the Turkish artist identifies it as the front line for exposing those vetoes imposed by religion that coincide with a still deeply patriarchal society.

Threshold is intentionally focused on the gender issue, in respect of the significant trust placed by Neriman Polat in the women’s universe: the reconfiguration of a society able to consider traditions as a constituent element and not as a justification for any kind of oppression. A specific cultural humus which would not fear the “other” and which could see in diversity the potential for an encounter.

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One thought on “Neriman Polat/ THRESHOLD

  1. Pingback: Disambigua Art Space | Uno spazio che si muove ThepassengerTimes - Disambigua Art Space

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