Michael Chandler

A portrait of the maiko Naokazu.

A portrait of the maiko Naokazu.

inspiration continues here

芸妓 尚可寿さん Kyoto, Japan. The geiko (geisha) Naokazu dressed as the 13th century writer Madame Fujiwara-Tameie (Abutsu Ni) in the Jidai Matsuri, one of the three big festivals of Kyoto. Over 2,000 people, including many geiko (geisha) and maiko (apprentice geisha), wore costumes representing various eras of Kyoto's 1,200-year history as they paraded through the city. Kyoto was the capital of Japan from 794 until 1868. It is now the seventh largest city in Japan. In Kyoto geisha are known as geiko and trainee geisha are known as maiko.

芸妓 尚可寿さん
Kyoto, Japan.
The geiko (geisha) Naokazu dressed as the 13th century writer Madame Fujiwara-Tameie (Abutsu Ni) in the Jidai Matsuri, one of the three big festivals of Kyoto.
Over 2,000 people, including many geiko (geisha) and maiko (apprentice geisha), wore costumes representing various eras of Kyoto’s 1,200-year history as they paraded through the city.
Kyoto was the capital of Japan from 794 until 1868. It is now the seventh largest city in Japan. In Kyoto geisha are known as geiko and trainee geisha are known as maiko.


The maiko (apprentice geisha) Konomi / 舞妓 小之美さん / Kyoto, Japan Performing a dance at Heian Shrine in dedication to the arrival of spring.

The maiko (apprentice geisha) Konomi / 舞妓 小之美さん / Kyoto, Japan
Performing a dance at Heian Shrine in dedication to the arrival of spring.

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